Thursday, November 27, 2008

Thanksgiving Day, 2008.

Every Wednesday before Thanksgiving Day, for over 40 years, the Wall Street Journal has reprinted two essays on its editorial page. The first is titled "The Desolate Wilderness." and is a brief chronicle based on William Bradford's account of the Pilgrim settlement. The second is "And the Fair Land" and reminds us to remember our good fortune in a world not often so blessed.

It is a good habit every Thanksgiving to read them. The following are two excerpts from the Wall Street Journal essays, and the links if you desire to read the entire essay (both are short):

Here beginneth the chronicle of those memorable circumstances of the year 1620, as recorded by Nathaniel Morton, keeper of the records of Plymouth Colony, based on the account of William Bradford, sometime governor thereof: So they left that goodly and pleasant city of Leyden, which had been their resting-place for above eleven years, but they knew that they were pilgrims and strangers here below, and looked not much on these things, but lifted up their eyes to Heaven, their dearest country, where God hath prepared for them a city (Heb. XI, 16), and therein quieted their spirits.

To read the balance of the editorial: http://online.wsj.com/article
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Any one whose labors take him into the far reaches of the country, as ours lately have done, is bound to mark how the years have made the land grow fruitful. This is indeed a big country, a rich country, in a way no array of figures can measure and so in a way past belief of those who have not seen it. Even those who journey through its Northeastern complex, into the Southern lands, across the central plains and to its Western slopes can only glimpse a measure of the bounty of America.

And a traveler cannot but be struck on his journey by the thought that this country, one day, can be even greater. America, though many know it not, is one of the great underdeveloped countries of the world; what it reaches for exceeds by far what it has grasped. So the visitor returns thankful for much of what he has seen, and, in spite of everything, an optimist about what his country might be. Yet the visitor, if he is to make an honest report, must also note the air of unease that hangs everywhere.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB119

2 comments:

Lynn said...

Thank you.

whoisjake said...

Excellent reads for sure! I'm a closet history nerd... well I'm actually a closet information nerd...

but alas, Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!!